Archive for the ‘Children’s Nonfiction’ Category

20 Titles of 2020 (Print edition)

December 22, 2020

[SAM]

I said it last year, and while a lot of things have changed, this particular sentiment of mine has not. So let me state once again that I’m not a big fan of creating best of lists, because I’m far too literal a person to declare anything “the best of 2020.” That being said, I have read all kinds of really wonderful books published this year. And I’ve read them in many of different formats. In this post I’ll focus on books we have physical copies of in the library, and in the next one I’ll do a round up of some 2020 favorites from overdrive and Hoopla. So as we head into the new year, here are 20 of my favorite titles published in 2020.

Young Adult Books

Just a boy and a girl in a little canoe by Sarah Mlynowski

The gravity of us by Phil Stamper

You should see me in a crown by Leah Johnson

Yes no maybe so by Becky Albertalli & Aisha Saeed

The voting booth by Brandy Colbert

Mind the gap, Dash & Lily by Rachel Cohn & David Levithan

10 things I hate about Pinky by Sandhya Menon

Nonfiction

She came to slay : the life and times of Harriet Tubman by Erica Armstrong Dunbar

Lifting as we climb : black women’s battle for the ballot box by Evette Dionne

True or false : a CIA analyst’s guide to spotting fake news by Cindy L. Otis.

Big friendship : how we keep each other close by Aminatou Sow, Ann Friedman.

Why we’re polarized / Ezra Klein

Kids Books

Kenzie kickstarts a team by Kit Rosewater

Ice breaker : how Mabel Fairbanks changed figure skating by Rose Viña

Finish the fight! : the brave and revolutionary women who fought for the right to vote by Veronica Chambers 

Comics

Primer : a superhero graphic novel written by Jennifer Muro & Thomas Krajewski

Check, Please! 2 : Sticks & Scones by Ngozi  Ukazu

Drawing the vote : an illustrated guide to voting in America by Tommy Jenkins 

Fiction

Party of two by Jasmine Guillory

Party of Two: Guillory, Jasmine: 9780593100813: Amazon.com: Books

Poetry

Everything comes next : collected and new poems  by Naomi Shihab Nye

Everything Comes Next: Collected and New Poems: Nye, Naomi Shihab:  9780063013452: Amazon.com: Books

19 Titles of 2019

December 12, 2019

[SAM]

I’m not a big fan of creating best of lists, because I’m far too literal a person to declare anything “the best of 2019.” That being said, I have read all kinds of really wonderful books published this year. So as we head into the new year, here are 19 of my favorite titles published in 2019.

Fiction

Nonfiction

YA

Kids Books

National Native American Heritage Month

November 7, 2019

[SAM]

November is National Native American Heritage Month. According to a study conducted by the Cooperative Children’s Book Center only one percent of children’s books published in 2018 depicted characters who are American Indian or First Nation. Here are some recommended titles all written by native authors:

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Sandwiches! More Than You’ve EVER Wanted to Know About Eating and Making America’s Favorite Food by Alison Deering

November 1, 2019

[SAM]

I am not known for my cooking skills. I am also not a person who really wishes to acquire a wide variety of cooking skills. I am basically just looking to feed myself and not be bored to death in the process. So for those of you that share my very lofty culinary goals may I recommend the book Sandwiches! More Than You’ve EVER Wanted to Know About Eating and Making America’s Favorite Food by Alison Deering

Part cookbook, part comic book, part infographic. Recipes are sorted by level, with level one requiring only a plate and knife to prepare, up to level five entitled “The Big Time.”  Interspersed with the wide range of sandwich recipes you’ll find “Between the Bread” pages that give you the history of classic sandwiches like the grilled cheese. This book is fun and easy to use. Definitely not your everyday average cookbook.

Ladybug Picture Book Award

October 7, 2019

[SAM]

Did you know New Hampshire has its own picture book award? The Ladybug Picture Book Award is designed to promote early literacy and honor the best in recent children’s picture books. A committee of children’s librarians from around the state selects 10 picture book titles each spring. Then, during November, New Hampshire children from preschoolers to those in third grade choose the award winner. The winning picture book is announced at the end of the year. This year’s nominees are truly fantastic. Stop by the kids room and check them out:

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Everybody Paints!: The Lives and Art of the Wyeth Family by Susan Goldman Rubin

February 16, 2018

[Lesley] Yes, this is a book written for elementary-aged children, but before you think it’s not for you, think again. This book is a wonderful read for children and adults who are interested in art and especially artists from New England whose work is iconic. I have been taken with work by the three Wyeths (N. C., Andrew, and Jamie) since I was in 6th grade. My mother took me to an exhibit of Andrew’s Helga paintings at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. The exhibit also included some other pieces and I remember distinctly Christina’s World. Part of my fascination probably came from my mother’s clear admiration and love of these paintings, but I had my own attraction to them as well. More recently, the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester had an exhibit of watercolors by Andrew Wyeth. Jamie takes a blend of his grandfather’s and father’s styles and creates one wholly his own. I love his portrayals of Monhegan Island and the coast of Maine along with his surprising portraits of animals and people, including one of Andy Warhol.

While I have admired the artwork of all three Wyeths over the years, I never knew much about them as people or their development as artists. Everybody Paints! was a perfect entry into their worlds and their training/education. The book starts with N. C. Wyeth, his childhood, his drive to create art despite his father’s disappointment, and his mentoring by the tough and eccentric Howard Pyle. N. C. Wyeth was a very successful illustrator (for the Saturday Evening Post and eventually for Scribner’s – remember those classic illustrations in Treasure Island?) but always struggled with wanting to be known as a “real” artist. Andrew left traditional school early, just like his father, in order to study art seriously with his father (N. C.) who gave Andrew his first watercolor set at age 13. After Andrew “graduated,” his father encouraged him to go to Maine to paint. There, Andrew found his talent for depicting the sea and quickly had a sold out exhibition. The Helga paintings were perhaps his crowning achievement and were in tempera, dry brush, watercolor, and pencil – showcasing his mastery in many mediums. Jamie is an illustrator, a portraitist, a landscape artist and a draftsman using watercolor, oil, charcoal and often using his fingers, sticks, and pieces of cloth instead of brushes.

I appreciated how the book focused on each Wyeth in turn, but also integrated each one into the other two lives – as it usually is in families. Being able to see how they each influenced each other was interesting, and even more so that the influence didn’t just work in one direction; the sons inspired and taught their fathers as well as the other way around. The quote from Jamie Wyeth on the back of the book (and where the book gets its title) sums it up: “Everybody in my family paints, excluding possibly the dogs.” I learned so much from reading this book and it made me want to seek out even more of their work.

Visit an Art Museum!
The library has discount passes that you can reserve online and then pick up at the library before your visit. Reserve Passes Here.

Find Books (and more!) about Art and Artists at the library: See a List of Library Books on Art and Artists

  • Children’s, Teen, and Adult nonfiction – Check Dewey numbers 708 – 760
  • Artist Biographies (children’s, teen, and adult) – Look in biographies under the artist’s last name
  • DVDs – Nonfiction 708

 

Women in Sports by Rachel Ignotofsky

December 11, 2017

[SAM] Look, I am here for all things Rachel Ignotofsky. I loved her women in science art long before it ever became her awesome first book “Women in Science.” So I was pretty sure I was going to like her follow-up “Women in Sports.” Then I opened to the first page and found the story of Madge Syers. Now, I know the story of Madge Syers, but I suspect you dear reader might not. And believe me, you want to know the story of Madge Syers. It might just change your opinion of her entire sport.

Oh, also the rest of the book is very good. You know, just in case you happen to not be as obsessed with Madge Syers as I am (not that I understand why, but hey people like what they like I guess). Filled with fifty stories and illustrations of amazing athletes. Learn a bit more about the awesome lives of Serena Williams and Simone Biles, and discover who Julie Krone and Patti McGee are. With one page of text on each athlete accompanied by an illustration surrounded with fast facts, this book makes it super easy to discover a new story each day! It’s definitely one of my favorite books of 2017. A great book for the whole family.

Available on audio at Hoopla.